2015 SBL Annual Meeting Sessions

Spread the wordShare on Facebook17Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+0Email this to someonePrint this page

List of Events: (Click a link to jump to its session below)
Annual Meeting Orientation
“A Wild Patience Has Taken Me this Far”: Future Avenues of Feminist Scholarship
Provenance in an eBay World: Does the Provenance of Ancient Artifacts Matter?
Babel: The Role of Primary Languages in Graduate Programs
Human Trafficking and the Bible: Linking the Past to the Present
What I’m Telling My Graduate Students Luncheon
Student Meet-Up

 

Annual Meeting Orientation


Date: 11/21/2015
Time: 8:15 AM to 9:00 AM
Room: A706 (Atrium Level) – Marriott
SBL Code: S21-103

Description:
The Student Advisory Board invites all meeting attendees to an informal Q&A session to share practical tips for maximizing your experience of the SBL Annual Meeting and for full conference participation. The topics discussed at this session include networking opportunities, meeting strategies, and session etiquette. Discussion will be facilitated by experienced meeting attendees. Please join us with your questions.


 

 

“A Wild Patience Has Taken Me this Far”: Future Avenues of Feminist Scholarship


Date: 11/22/2015
Time: 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Room: A602 (Atrium Level) – Marriott
SBL Code: S22-301

Description:
Scholars employing a feminist hermeneutic have advanced the fields of Jewish Studies and Early Christianity while pioneering the new field of Late Antiquity. This session hopes to foster a conversation about the various ways that the feminist lens has been applied to Jewish and Christian texts of Late Antiquity while keeping an eye to what future avenues lie still unexplored. What questions have not been answered? What challenges remain for female scholars in these fields? How can our scholarship speak to Feminist political causes today and in the future? It is our hope that this panel can provide graduate students and young scholars with an opportunity to engage established scholars from a variety of backgrounds to engage these pressing concerns.

The Panel:
Erin G. Walsh, Duke University, Presiding
Krista Dalton, Columbia University in the City of New York, Presiding
Elizabeth Castelli, Barnard College, Panelist
Kate Cooper, University of Manchester, Panelist
Sarit Kattan Gribetz, Fordham University, Panelist
Marjorie S. Lehman, Jewish Theological Seminary of America, Panelist
Caroline Schroeder, University of the Pacific, Panelist
Kimberly Stratton, Carleton University, Panelist
Elizabeth A. Clark, Duke University, Respondent
Charlotte Fonrobert, Stanford University, Respondent


 

Provenance in an eBay World: Does the Provenance of Ancient Artifacts Matter?


Date: 11/23/2015
Time: 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Room: 303 (Level 3) – Hilton
SBL Code: S23-139

Description:
From Gospel of John papyrus fragments appearing on eBay to debates surrounding the origins of modern fragments (e.g., the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife, or the new Sappho fragments), the provenance of antiquities has emerged as a challenging issue for scholars and students who work with material culture. This session aims to illuminate some of the stakes around the debate for graduate students. The panel will examine issues of working on materials kept in public and private collections, and highlight the individuals and institutions who are working to create policies and practices that address the issue of provenance. As of now, SBL has no formal policy on the provenance of antiquities, but is actively formulating one. It is the hope of the panel that graduate students will find this panel to be a networking opportunity and source of support for their future academic work.

The Panel:
Ross P. Ponder, University of Texas at Austin, Presiding
Robert Kraft, University of Pennsylvania, Panelist
Christine M. Thomas, University of California-Santa Barbara, Panelist
Brice C. Jones, Concordia University – Université Concordia, Panelist
Sofia Torallas Tovar, University of Chicago, Panelist
Malcolm Choat, Macquarie University, Panelist


 

Babel: The Role of Primary Languages in Graduate Programs


Date: 11/23/2015
Time: 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Room: 204 (Level 2) – Hilton
SBL Code: S23-307

Description:
This session seeks to address the issue of languages as a part of graduate education in Bible-related programs. Many Bible-related programs have reduced requirements for primary language study. Reasons for this include the increased use of Bible software, cost, the rising importance of “practical” ministry courses, and a greater emphasis on methodology. This raises the question, “What will be the role of primary languages in Bible related graduate programs in the future?” In fact, in a recent book review, Na’ama Pat-El stated,

If [the author] wishes to restore Semitic Philology to its glory days, he is fighting a valiant but ultimately hopeless battle…Very few Bible programs in the U.S. require their students to study more than Hebrew and a semester of Aramaic, not because they fail to see the significance of a broad and thorough education, but because they cannot afford it…It is high time we recognize that traditional philology is not coming back and seek to address our students’ education accordingly, without compromising their knowledge of primary sources.

How, then, do graduate programs address students’ education accordingly, without compromising their knowledge of primary sources? What level of mastery should graduate students be expected to achieve? How many languages should graduate students take? How should graduate students balance knowledge of primary source languages with that of modern research languages (e.g., German, French, Modern Hebrew)? And what about marketability: Are students who possess research knowledge in many languages more marketable than those who have less? The invited speakers will attempt to address the issue of the future of primary language study in Bible related grad programs, and will offer graduate students their perspectives on how to best prepare themselves for future research and marketability, navigate the current constraints of graduate education, and ensure that they can access primary sources.

The Panel:
Jason Riley, Fuller Theological Seminary (Pasadena), Presiding
Na’ama Pat-El, University of Texas at Austin, Philology and the Study of the Bible: Shifting Foci (20 min)
Ronald Hendel, University of California-Berkeley, Future Philology (20 min)
J. Ross Wagner, Duke University, The End of Philology (20 min)
Jacqueline Vayntrub, University of Chicago, Teaching Philology: Its Ideals and Its Practice (20 min)


 

Human Trafficking and the Bible: Linking the Past to the Present


Date: 11/23/2015
Time: 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Room: 406 (Level 4) – Hilton

Description:
The aims of this session is to connect the past to the present about an important and current topic – human trafficking. While this has elements that relate to other areas of scholarship within the academy (i.e. culture, Hebrew Scripture, forced exile, liberation, enslavement, redemption etc), there is no direct relationship to ay other panel or session. This panel’s focus is unique, timely, and important. In fact, the presenters and other people either invited or consulted with are in support of this panel and quite excited about the prospect of this topic being introduced and presented at the annual meeting. Because of the huge issue and attention of human trafficking and the narratives as well as traditions that existed in the Ancient Near East, are we able to make a connection to the present day? This session will focus on the connection of the Biblical Narratives (or text) to modern day human trafficking and forced migration through the lens of current theological implications, focusing on that of the victim and/or survivor. The panel will explore whether biblical narratives in books such as Genesis, Numbers, Judges, among others, as well as other writings and traditions from the Ancient Near East and elsewhere, can be used to better understand the plight of the victims. Ultimately, the question explored is whether the texts and related traditions, by linking the past to the present, provide any promise of redemption or hope theologically?

The Panel:
Michele Stopera Freyhauf, University of Durham, Presiding
Tammi Schneider, Claremont Graduate University, Panelist
Shelley Long, Azusa Pacific University, Panelist
Diana M. Swancutt, Boston University, Panelist
Hector Avalos, Iowa State University, Panelist
Carole R. Fontaine, Andover Newton Theological School, Panelist
Sheila E. McGinn, John Carroll University, Respondent


 

What I’m Telling My Graduate Students (REGISTRATION IS NOW CLOSED)


Date: 11/23/2015
Time: 11:00 AM to 12:45 PM
Room: International North (International Tower Level LL1) – Hyatt
SBL Code: S23-152

Description:
Preregistration is required for this luncheon because of limited space. This session provides graduate students with an opportunity to learn from the academic experiences of established scholars through short presentations of their academic autobiographies and smaller group discussions. Each panelist will have 5-7 minutes to talk about their graduate school experience and discuss what they are telling their current students about navigating the field of biblical and religious studies. These presentations will be followed by smaller group discussions over lunch.

 

Student Meet-Up


Date: 11/21/2015
Time: 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Room: Max Lager’s (320 Peachtree St., Atlanta, Georgia 30308

Description: Come join us and other student members for an informal lunch! To help us keep track of numbers, please let us know if you are going on our Facebook event page.

Spread the wordShare on Facebook17Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+0Email this to someonePrint this page

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *